HealthCare.gov's Problems Make Reliable Enrollment Numbers Impossible, Sebelius Says

One month into open enrollment on the health insurance exchanges, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius apologized for what she described as a "miserably frustrating experience for way too many Americans" on the federal online marketplace known as HealthCare.gov.
Published Online: October 30, 2013

One month into open enrollment on the health insurance exchanges, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius apologized for what she described as a "miserably frustrating experience for way too many Americans" on the federal online marketplace known as HealthCare.gov.

Appearing Wednesday before the full House Energy and Commerce Committee, the Obama administration's top health official spent more than three hours fielding questions about problems with the federal Web portal, decisions that HHS and CMS made before the Oct. 1 launch of open enrollment, privacy and security concerns for consumers, accountability of federal contractors working on the federal system, and President Barack Obama's earlier promise that Americans who like their health insurance plans can keep them.

Sebelius maintained a cool and composed manner as she served as the sole witness before the influential House panel that has jurisdiction over healthcare. She acknowledged from the outset that access to HealthCare.gov has been a frustrating experience for too many Americans, many of whom she said have waited years for the security of health insurance coverage.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/16N9ShD

Source: Modern Healthcare



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