How PCORI Can Improve Quality Of Care (And Prove It) By 2019

Despite the considerable resources designated to PCORI, its future remains tenuous.
Published Online: May 05, 2014

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) was established with the passing of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 to oversee and set guidelines for comparative effectiveness research (CER). PCORI was also designed with a sustainable funding model, having received $210 million from 2010 to 2012 and expected appropriations of $150 million annually via fees imposed on Medicare and private health insurance companies. The international comparative effectiveness research community has recognized PCORI as the most funded CER initiative in existence, far surpassing the annual budgets of comparable international programs such as U.K.’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE).

Despite the considerable resources designated to PCORI, its future remains tenuous. For one, the ACA legislation also created a “sunset date” of September 2019, giving PCORI seven years to convince Congress to reauthorize funding for the institute. Further, legislative efforts have already been made to repeal PCORI; H.R. 3827 was introduced by Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-KY) in January 2012, asking for immediate elimination of PCORI.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1j2hQxd

Source: Health Affairs



Feature
Recommended Articles
Genevieve Kumapley, PharmD, BCOP, reflects on the significant out-of-pocket costs associated with oral oncolytics and suggests how a change in benefit design can help patients afford the treatments they need.
During this segment, Genevieve Kumapley, PharmD, BCOP, discusses the significance of introducing a self-care plan to patients who are undergoing cancer treatment.
All-cause mortality and hospitalization rates and inpatient expenditures among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries decreased from 1999 to 2013.
Legislative action on Medicare’s Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) could have important implications for physicians, especially in terms of financial risk. In the 13th part of the Healthcare Reform Stakeholder Summit, panelists Francois de Brantes, MS, MBA, Ateev Mehrotra, MD, MPH, and Arthur Vercillo, MD, FACS, delved into the topic of SGR reform.
Two inexpensive generic drugs have been shown to reduce breast cancer deaths in postmenopausal women, according to studies published in The Lancet.