Improved Detection of Metastasized Prostate Cancer with a New Tracer

A study conducted at the Johns Hopkins University demonstrates improved detection of prostate cancer metastasis following the injection of 18F-DCFBC, which binds PSMA.
Published Online: June 11, 2014

A new radiotracing agent injected before PET/CT might improve the detection of metastasized prostate cancer, compared with conventional imaging, in patients with castration-resistant disease, according to preliminary results from a new study.

The agent, known as 18F-DCFBC, binds to prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a protein that is "highly expressed in prostate cancer, allowing for optimal signal detection," senior author Steve Cho, MD, PhD, from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, told Medscape Medical News.

His group previously showed, in a first-in-human trial, that the tracer could detect sites of metastatic prostate cancer (J Nucl Med2012;53:1883-1891).

Original report: http://bit.ly/1s5rW6f

Source: Medscape



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