NPP Demand Rising Under Value-Based Care Models

Multispecialty medical practices with non-physician providers typically perform better financially than those without physician assistants and nurse practitioners.
Published Online: April 17, 2014

Multispecialty medical practices with non-physician providers typically perform better financially than those without physician assistants and nurse practitioners, an MGMA report finds.

The use of physician assistants, nurse practitioners and other "non-physician providers" continues to accelerate with the advent of value-based, coordinated care delivery, a Medical Group Management Association analysis shows.

The report examined growth in the use of non-physician providers at multispecialty practices and found that the number of full-time-equivalent NPPs per FTE physician has increased by 11% since 2008. Correspondingly, the analysis determined that medical practices with NPPs typically perform better financially, perhaps because the NPPs boost patient capacity and improve access to providers.

Read the full story here: http://bit.ly/1gI0STh

Source: Healthleader Media



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