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Family History Alone May Not Tell the Tale in Jewish Women
Although family history is a risk factor, a new study has shown that it should not be the primary determinant of mutation screening for breast and ovarian cancer.
White House Appoints New Chief Technology Officer, Deputy
The White House named former Google executive Megan Smith as its new chief technology officer to succeed Athenahealth co-founder and HHS veteran Todd Park, who is credited with helping rescue HealthCare.gov.
Pembrolizumab Approved For Advanced Melanoma
Following a breakthrough therapy designation, pembrolizumab was included in FDA's accelerated approval program to allow early patient access.
Opdivo Reignites the Drug Pricing Discussion
While Sovaldi is still fresh on the mind, Ono Pharmaceutical's Opdivo (nivolumab), marketed jointly with BMS in Japan, has analysts projecting what the treatment might cost in the US.
Ruling Against Obamacare to Get a Second Look
The Appeals Court for the District of Columbia announced Thursday that it would re-hear Halbig v. Burwell en banc, meaning the entire panel of 11 judges will weigh in on the case. There will also be two senior judges who hear the case, but do not vote.
Maine Shrinks Medicaid Coverage As Other New England States Expand
Maine is one of twenty-three states nationally to stay away from Medicaid Expansion.
Perspective: The Value of Care and QALY
Does $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) hold value in today's age of high-priced specialty drugs? The authors evaluate this yardstick and recommend changes that could aid cost-effectiveness decisions.
Global Diabetes Rates Are a Barrier to TB Control
If diabetes rates continue to rise out of control, the present downward trajectory in global TB cases could be offset by 8% (ie, 8% less reduction) or more by 2035, warn the authors of a new article.
Healthcare Spending Growth Expected to Pick Up This Year to 5.6%
The economy's lackluster recovery eroded wages and left millions chronically unemployed. It also offered significant relief from the fiscal distress of U.S. health spending. Now, spending fueled by the improving economy and the healthcare reform law's insurance and Medicaid expansions are likely to turn that around.
3 Reasons Insurance Premiums Won't 'Skyrocket' Next Year
Despite what some media reports have to say, health insurance premiums won't "skyrocket" next year, according to an article by ConsumerReports.
Medicaid Expansion: Opt-Out States Cover Those Who Opted-In
States who refused to expand Medicaid will pay for other states that did; an investment without returns unless they participate in the expansion program.
Halozyme's PEGPH20 Receives Fast-Track Designation
The program is being developed to treat metastatic prostate cancer.
American Lung Association Applauds CVS: Tobacco Products are Off the Shelf
CVS accelerated its timeline from October to September to stop selling tobacco and related products in its retail stores.
JAMA Study Does Not Find Improved Survival With Double Mastectomy
Survival at 10 years was no better when women had double mastectomies.
ASCO Updates Clinical Guidelines for HER2-Negative Breast Cancer
The guidelines suggest various treatment options available, following consideration of the patient's status and preference.
Opioid Abuse and Cancer: The Patient's Perspective
Concerns about addiction and abuse may prevent patients from informing their oncologist about their level of pain.
Lifestyle Counseling To Meld Into Treatment Regimens?
The USPSTF recommendations are already being practiced by some payers like BCBS and Aetna.
ACA Woes Continue For Some
Glitches in the website could prevent individuals from submitting immigration documents, resulting in fines or loss of coverage.
Cabozantinib Fails in Phase 3
The company developing the drug, Excelis, now plans to focus it's attention on the ongoing kidney and liver cancer trials for the drug.
Another Role for Plans: Help Consumers Make the Most of Their Health Benefits
Navigating the complex health care system isn’t always easy, especially for newly enrolled consumers who are using their new benefits for the first time. But health plans are there to help these new consumers sort through the system and prepare them to take charge of their health coverage and care.
FDA Plan To Diversify Clinical Trials Raises Some Concerns
In response to a law passed two years ago, the FDA was directed to assess the extent to which women and minorities are represented in clinical trials and also devise a plan to bolster their participation.
Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine in Kids Can Trim Caseload And Be Cost-Effective, Especially in a Bad Season, Study Finds
With flu vaccination season upon us, the question arises, shot or nasal spray? For children, a nasal spray might be an easier option, and a new study just published in The American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits shows that if a moderate to harsh flu season is expected, it’s a cost-effective choice, too.
In Healthcare Reform, Helping Patients Pick the Right Doctor Is Key to Accountable Care
Of the many elements in healthcare reform, one essential has been overlooked: helping patients pick the doctor who is right for them. In an commentary appearing in Evidence-Based Oncology, a publication of The American Journal of Managed Care, Brian W. Powers and Sachin H. Jain, MD, MBA, outline a framework for accountable physician selection, noting that the higher the stakes, the more important this process.
States Step in to Regulate Drug Co-pays
Consurers may need to find new ways to control costs for specialty drugs, as more states add limits to cost-sharing and utilization continues to grow.
Formularies, a Tool in the Fight for Affordable Life-Saving Care
Health plans have a long list of tools they use to deliver better value and access to health care consumers.