Saladax Biomedical Offers PK-Guided Dosing for 5-FU

Saladax Biomedical's MY5-FU blood test will help personalize and optimize 5-fluorouracil dosing in cancer patients.
Published Online: April 01, 2014
Saladax Biomedical, Inc. announced today that Saladax Biomedical Laboratories is offering a simple blood test for the personalization and optimization of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) dosing to help oncologists improve treatment outcomes and minimize the drug’s toxic side effects. The test is called My5-FU™. 5-FU is a chemotherapy drug commonly used in the treatment of many different cancer types, including colorectal, head & neck and breast cancers.

My5-FU is one of a line of MyCare™ blood tests offered by Saladax Biomedical Laboratories. The test requires a simple venous blood draw to be performed a minimum of two hours prior to the end of a 5-FU infusion cycle. The My5-FU test results provide the oncologist information about the concentration of the drug in the patient’s blood as well as their overall systemic exposure to the drug. Based on the exposure levels, the doctor can adjust the next dose to achieve the optimal exposure level for best treatment results with minimized toxicities. This method of personalized dosing is referred to as pharmacokinetic (PK) guided dosing.

Read the press release here: 
http://bit.ly/1lAughJ

Source: Saladax website

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