Walgreens-Komen Foundation Collaborate to Raise $15 Million for Breast Cancer

Published Online: May 08, 2014
Women and men in thousands of communities across the country will benefit from breast cancer screenings, treatment support and new innovative programs thanks to more than $15 million in funds raised by Walgreens and its customers for Susan G. Komen, the world’s largest breast cancer organization.  

More than 8,000 Walgreens locations across the country invited customers to support Susan G. Komen through a checkout promotion which took place during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (October) of 2012 and 2013. Customers donated an astounding total of $15 million over the two years to support Komen’s breast cancer programs throughout the country and in Puerto Rico. 

Last year alone, the Walgreens program allowed Komen to fund more than 15,000 mammograms for uninsured or underinsured individuals and support education and patient navigation services to another 222,000. These funds also supported the expansion of Komen’s National Breast Care Helpline (1-877-GO-KOMEN); provided funding for Komen’s National Treatment Assistance Program; and supported grants for community outreach and patient support programs in the Washington, D.C. area, where breast cancer incidence and mortality rates are the highest in the nation.

Source: Susan G. Komen


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