Currently Viewing:
Evidence-Based Diabetes Management March 2018
The Potential of a Population Health Strategy to Improve Healthcare Outcomes and Reduce Costs for Medicaid Programs
David J. Dzielak, PhD
How Technology Can Make CMS' Diabetes Prevention Program Viable
Dan Sheeran
Applying Digital Technology in Clinical Trials to Improve Real-World Outcomes
Henry Anhalt, DO
Currently Reading
Geographic Access to Endocrinologists for Florida's Publicly Insured Children With Diabetes
Ashby F. Walker, PhD; Jaclyn M. Hall, PhD; Elizabeth A. Shenkman, PhD; Matthew J. Gurka, PhD; Heather L. Morris, PhD; Michael J. Haller, MD; Henry J. Rohrs, MD; Kelsey R. Salazar, MPH; and Desmond A. Schatz, MD
Guidance That Allows for Higher A1C Misses the Mark
Robert A. Gabbay, MD, PhD, FACP

Geographic Access to Endocrinologists for Florida's Publicly Insured Children With Diabetes

Ashby F. Walker, PhD; Jaclyn M. Hall, PhD; Elizabeth A. Shenkman, PhD; Matthew J. Gurka, PhD; Heather L. Morris, PhD; Michael J. Haller, MD; Henry J. Rohrs, MD; Kelsey R. Salazar, MPH; and Desmond A. Schatz, MD
Enrollment, claims, and spatial data are used to demonstrate the importance of outreach strategies for families in rural areas who have children with diabetes. Spatial barriers, alone, do not fully elucidate racial/ethnic disparities in pediatric diabetes for street-level location. (For Tables and the Figure, please access the PDF on the last page.)
Abstract
Enrollment files, eligibility files, and claims/encounter data were used to identify 7233 children with diabetes in Florida’s public insurance programs to examine driving times they encounter to reach in-network endocrinologists who serve publicly insured children with diabetes in Florida; the children are categorized by sociodemographic characteristics. Average driving times to pediatric endocrinologists were ≤30 minutes for children in urban areas but ≥70 minutes for children in rural communities. White children faced the longest driving times; only 56% were ≤30 minutes from a pediatric endocrinologist. These data reinforce the importance of outreach strategies for families in rural areas and demonstrate that spatial barriers, alone, do not fully elucidate racial/ethnic disparities in pediatric diabetes.for street-level location.

 

Become a Member to see the rest of this article and get access to all of our articles and resources. Membership is Free!

 
Copyright AJMC 2006-2018 Clinical Care Targeted Communications Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
x
Welcome the the new and improved AJMC.com, the premier managed market network. Tell us about yourself so that we can serve you better.
Sign Up
×

Sign In

Not a member? Sign up now!