Swedish Study Assesses Impact of Staff Workshops on A1C in Patients With Diabetes

January 5, 2020

The workshops were aimed at ensuring that primary care centers were following clinical care guidelines developed after 2011 meeting requirements of a national certification program.

A 4-part workshop model aimed at caregivers in primary care centers was shown to help improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Sweden, a study published in Primary Care Diabetes found.

The workshops were aimed at ensuring that primary care centers were following clinical care guidelines developed after 2011 meeting requirements of a national certification program. Researchers focused on primary care centers in Stockholm County, which has 180 primary care centers total. Twenty-three centers with the highest percentage of patients with high A1C (> 70 mmol/mol) were selected. Each care center also had over 100 patients.

Each of the centers was sent an invitation to join the study, and 9 accepted. Three primary care centers from another study were also included. Four workshops of 2 hours each were hosted, which offered the caregiver staff an introduction, analysis tools, action plans, and group discussions. There was a 12- and 24-month follow up after the last workshop.

The results showed that patients in the participating centers had a reduction in patients with high glycated hemoglobin (A1C) at the 12-month mark. However, not all of the centers maintained the reduction at the 24-month mark. Only 2 centers reached the 24-month mark with a higher percentage of patients above the high A1C threshold than at baseline; 1 of these centers only took part in 2 workshop sessions.

“Working with the structure of diabetes care improved care structure and had a positive impact on [A1C]. To sustain the positive impact, [primary care centers] had to set long-term goals and regularly evaluate performance,” the study states.

The strengths of the study included a standardized workshop model. Participants found the model easy to use and the facilitator was easily assessable during and after the workshops. However, the low acceptance rate was a limitation of the study. Additionally, 2 centers dropped out early. The analysis tool was also unvalidated. Future studies will evaluate a larger- scale implementation of the workshop model.

Reference

Stattin NS, Kane K, Stenback M, Wajngot A, Seijboldt K. Improving the structure of diabetes care in primary care. Primary Diabetes Care. 2020;14(1):33-39. doi:doi.org/10.1016/j.pcd.2019.05.005.