Top 5 Most-Popular Interviews of 2020

December 30, 2020
Matthew Gavidia
Matthew Gavidia

Matthew is an associate editor of The American Journal of Managed Care® (AJMC®). He has been working on AJMC® since 2019 after receiving his Bachelor's degree at Rutgers University–New Brunswick in journalism and economics.

In 2020, the top 5 most-watched interviews published on AJMC.com addressed a myriad of different issues within breast cancer, cardiology, and HIV, with additional perspectives on the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.

In 2020, the most-watched interviews conducted by The American Journal of Managed Care® (AJMC®) addressed a myriad of different issues within breast cancer, cardiology, and HIV, with additional perspectives on the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Here are the 5 most-watched interviews published on AJMC.com in 2020.

5. Dr Aditya Bardia: Further Research Is Needed to Understand Resistance to Sacituzumab Govitecan

Addressing the clinical activity of sacituzumab govitecan that led to its FDA accelerated approval earlier this year, Aditya Bardia, MBBS, MPH, breast medical oncologist, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, notes that the indication exhibited more than double the response rate than standard chemotherapy for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer who received at least 2 prior lines of therapy. Speaking further on signs of treatment failure, Bardia says that if someone is having more pain and more symptoms, then there's concern for disease progression and scans are warranted.

Watch the full interview.

4. Dr Kerin Adelson Discusses Evolution in Physician Response to Quality Care Initiatives

In an interview with Kerin Adelson, MD, associate professor, chief quality officer, and deputy chief medical officer for Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale New Haven/Yale Cancer Center, she spoke on how reception to quality care initiatives among physicians have evolved over time. Whereas for many years it was the doctor who knew best, Adelson highlights that there is now gradual understanding among physicians that evidence-based medicine matters when it comes to cost-effectiveness and the quality of care delivered.

Watch the full interview.

3. Dr Manan Pareek Shares Data From the Cardiac Complications Registry in Patients With COVID-19

Speaking on cardiovascular implications amid the pandemic, Manan Pareek, MD, PhD, FAHA, FESC, an internal medicine hospital resident at the Yale University School of Medicine, says in an interview with AJMC® that providers need to focus on detection and treatment of cardiovascular complications in at-risk patients and not solely focus on their COVID-19 diagnosis. Pareek addressed the need for more aggressive monitoring of these patients from a cardiovascular perspective by having a lower threshold for conducting echocardiograms or other types of imaging.

Watch the full interview.

2. Dr Anthony Fauci Speaks to the Likelihood of Vaccines for HIV and COVID-19

In an interview to mark the 25th anniversary of AJMC®, Anthony S. Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, noted how there’s never a guarantee with vaccinology but that he and other officials feel fairly confident that there would be a vaccine for COVID-19 by year’s end—a prediction that was borne out in December. The same cannot be said for HIV, he added, because the immune system’s response has thus far not been adequate enough to clear the virus.

Watch the full interview.

1. Dr Anthony Fauci Discusses the Systemic Effects of COVID-19

In another interview with the nation’s top infectious disease expert, Fauci says that although COVID-19 is largely a respiratory disease, it is also a systemic disease that has a wide range of effects and postinfection sequelae that aren’t yet fully known. Notably, he spoke on the unprecedented range of severity associated with COVID-19, from people who get a stuffy nose and a sore throat to people who have serious lung involvement that either puts them in the hospital or necessitates intubation, and people who die due to complications.

Watch the full interview.