What We're Reading: Meth Overdoses Surge; Oklahoma Medicaid Campaign; FTC Sues for Diabetes Claims

October 25, 2019

A CDC report said that, overall, fentanyl continues to drive drug overdose deaths, but in almost half of the country, methamphetamine is the leading killer; backers of Medicaid expansion in Oklahoma said they submitted more than enough signatures to get the measure on the ballot in 2020; the Federal Trade Commission is suing publishers of "The Doctor's Guide to Reversing Diabetes in 28 Days" on the grounds that they are falsely promising a cure without dietary changes or exercise and stating that those changes will make diabetes worse.

Methamphetamine Overtakes Fentanyl as Leading Overdose Cause in Some Parts of the United States

Oklahoma Supporters of Medicaid Expansion Submit Signatures for 2020 Ballot

A CDC report said that, overall, fentanyl continues to drive drug overdose deaths, but in almost half of the country, methamphetamine is the leading killer. Across the United States, methamphetamine is the fourth leading killer, cited in 13% of overdose deaths. But in 4 western regions, it is number 1, at 21% to 38%, The Associated Press reported.Backers of Medicaid expansion in Oklahoma said they submitted more than enough signatures to get the measure on the ballot in 2020. Supporters estimate that almost 200,000 people in Oklahoma stand to gain coverage if the effort succeeds, The Hill reported. The "Yes on 802" campaign said it submitted more than 313,000 signatures, far more than the roughly 178,000 it needed, The Hill reported. Utah, Idaho, and Nebraska voters approved ballot measures approving Medicaid expansion in last year’s elections. The Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, a conservative think tank in the state, has vowed an opposition effort.

FTC Sues Publishers of Diabetes Newsletters for Peddling Claims of a Cure

The Federal Trade Commission is suing publishers of "The Doctor's Guide to Reversing Diabetes in 28 Days" on the grounds that they are falsely promising a cure without dietary changes or exercise and stating that those changes will make diabetes worse. The publications claim a "shocking, hidden cause" of type 2 diabetes is exposure to electronic devices, such as computers, televisions, and cellphones. Five Baltimore-based companies, including Agora Financial LLC and NewMarket Health LLC, and 2 men identified as editors, are named as defendants, The Associated Press reported.