Thomas Morrow, MD

Thomas Morrow, MD, is the chief medical officer for Next IT. His current position is the culmination of his passion to improve clinical outcomes for people with chronic disease through the use advanced natural language processing and artificial intelligence. He graduated from Thomas Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, practiced family medicine for 14 years, and held a variety of positions including a faculty position at a residency and medical school, staff physician at a staff model health maintenance organization, and numerous medical director positions at multiple health plans.

Articles

SXSW Focuses on Patient Behavior

March 21, 2016

Patient behavior is perhaps the final frontier to concur in our quest of making our population healthier. But, how can we change the health behavior of nearly 200,000,000 Americans? A SXSW panel discussed some individual approaches using innovative technology.

25% Reduction in Rheumatoid Arthritis bDMARD Cost Possible With Avatar Assistance

July 15, 2015

A rheumatoid arthritis—focused Virtual Health Assistant (aka avatar) could help save US health plans over $1 billion per year by providing the data needed to pursue an evidence-based dose reduction/discontinuation strategy for biologic DMARDs (bDMARDs). The science is strong, but is the will equally strong?

Companies Focused on Using AI and NLP for Patient Education, Behavior Modification: Part 1

June 11, 2015

Although there are numerous companies providing natural language processing services, there are only a handful that are focusing their efforts on direct-to-person coaching. Here are 2 companies who chose to submit a review of their agents and their capabilities.

Automated Intelligent Engagement Using a Virtual Health Assistant

June 03, 2015

Advanced technology is now available to not only monitor patients at home but also to incorporate a myriad of data sources into intelligent engagement platforms. The Virtual Health Assistant will become the brain of the Intelligent Engagement Plecosystem