Psych Congress 2015

Psych Congress 2015
Psych Congress 2015, dedicated to psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and wellness, will take place September 10-13, 2015, in San Diego, California. Hosted by the US Psychiatric & Mental Health Congress, the event focuses on current and emerging mental health treatment strategies and implementing measurement-based care in everyday clinical practice. Sign up for our daily e-mail blasts on our registration page, and check back here during the conference for the full coverage.
September 13, 2015
The limited number of FDA approved medications indicated for bipolar depression makes treatment challenging, said Terence A. Ketter, MD. Several drugs that have been tested could not meet standards to receive an indication.
September 13, 2015
Becoming familiar with the subtle signs that a hallucination is fake can allow psychiatrists to keep patients out of the hospital when they have no business being there.
September 12, 2015
Presenters who have implemented telehealth to treat PTSD through the VA in Charleston, South Carolina, say it will help address shortages of mental health providers and offer care that is just as good as in-person treatment.
September 12, 2015
Studies show medication adherence in bipolar disorder is only about 40% to 45%, but this dangerous, progressive disease has a high suicide rate. Adherence is complicated by the fact that patients may miss the mild "high" that many associate with periods of creativity, says Kay Redfield Jamison, PhD.
September 12, 2015
Promising tests in animal models for an immunotherapy to control methamphetamine addiction have paved the way for human trials that could start in May 2016, according to Thomas Kosten, MD.
September 12, 2015
A 30-day intervention that includes exercise, nutrition, mindfulness, social connectedness, and sleep resulted in improved scores across a series of wellbeing measures for a small group of patients.
September 11, 2015
Peter Weiden, MD, says that psychiatrists have greater ability to address side effects from antipsychotics than they did 10 years ago. It's essential that clinicians take patient concerns seriously, because when they don't patients may react by stopping their medication.
September 11, 2015
Ten years of following patients who had a period of strong social supports after a first psychotic episode shows that the effects of that care wane over time once the help is removed. Joseph P. McEvoy, MD, of Georgia Regents University said the studies show the support should continue.
September 11, 2015
Michael E. Thase, MD, said that current antidepressants are "good, not great" but that there is interest in research into ketamine, even though researchers are not completely sure how it works.
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