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The American Journal of Managed Care March 2018
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False-Positive Mammography and Its Association With Health Service Use
Christine M. Gunn, PhD; Barbara Bokhour, PhD; Tracy A. Battaglia, MD, MPH; Rebecca A. Silliman, MD, PhD; and Amresh Hanchate, PhD
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False-Positive Mammography and Its Association With Health Service Use

Christine M. Gunn, PhD; Barbara Bokhour, PhD; Tracy A. Battaglia, MD, MPH; Rebecca A. Silliman, MD, PhD; and Amresh Hanchate, PhD
This study demonstrated that a false-positive mammogram was associated with increases in outpatient visits, but not provider referrals, for 1 year post mammogram.
ABSTRACT

Objectives: A false-positive mammogram can result in anxiety, distress, and increased perceptions of breast cancer risk, potentially changing how women utilize healthcare. This study examined whether having an abnormal mammogram, considered a proxy for elevated risk perception, was associated with greater future health service use (outpatient visits and referrals).

Study Design: A retrospective cohort study using electronic health record data, spanning 2008 to 2012, from Boston Medical Center, a safety-net hospital.

Methods: We grouped 3920 women aged 40 to 75 years receiving primary care and who had a mammogram between 2010 and 2011 into 3 categories: false-positive mammogram at index date; previous false positive, but normal index mammogram; and no history of false-positive mammograms. We contrasted the longitudinal changes in outpatient visits and provider referrals, before versus after the index mammogram, between women with false-positive mammogram and those without using Poisson regression models with a difference-in-differences specification. Clinical, visit, and demographic data were obtained from the institutional clinical data warehouse.

Results: Adjusting for baseline differences in sociodemographic characteristics across risk groups and for secular changes between pre- and postindex periods, a current false-positive mammogram was associated with an 18% increase in overall outpatient visits (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.18; 95% CI, 1.07-1.51), but no corresponding increase in provider referrals (IRR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.99‑1.34), relative to never having a false positive. A previous false-positive mammogram had no associated change in outpatient utilization (IRR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.91-1.07).

Conclusions: Providers should discuss the implications of mammography findings at the time of screening to help mitigate potential detrimental effects and promote appropriate engagement in health services.

Am J Manag Care. 2018;24(3):131-138

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