Ali McBride, PharmD, MS, BCOP, Becomes ACCC President 2019-2020

March 27, 2019

Ali McBride, PharmD, MS, BCOP, was named 2019-2020 president of the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) during its 45th Annual Meeting & Cancer Center Business Summit on March 22, 2019, in Washington, DC. McBride is the clinical coordinator of hematology/oncology at The University of Arizona Cancer Center.

Ali McBride, PharmD, MS, BCOP, was named 2019-2020 president of the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) during its 45th Annual Meeting & Cancer Center Business Summit on March 22, 2019, in Washington, DC. McBride is the clinical coordinator of hematology/oncology at The University of Arizona Cancer Center.

“During this exciting time of advancement in caring for patients with cancer, I am both honored and privileged to serve as president of the Association of Community Cancer Centers,” said McBride.

ACCC has a strong legacy of presidential themes that address timely issues in oncology, such as patient empowerment and provider engagement, envisioning next generation multidisciplinary cancer care, and building a resilient cancer care team. McBride hopes to build on his predecessors’ contributions with his president’s theme of "Collaborate. Educate. Compensate: A Prescription for Sustainable Cancer Care Delivery."

“As the 'together we are stronger' organization, ACCC is committed to collaboration—creating and sharing strategies and opportunities that bring oncology care providers from multiple disciplines together as an efficient, highly-functioning team,” said McBride.

Through his president’s theme, McBride will work with the ACCC membership to reduce current organizational and professional siloes hampering new and evolving collaborations needed to deliver high-quality patient-centered oncology services.

“As our options for treating cancers grow, the cancer care team continues to innovate and evolve,” said McBride. “Today’s multidisciplinary oncology team is expanding and leveraging new healthcare disciplines to engage in patient care. The advent of novel therapies, new molecular pathologic identification of cancer diseases, and new disease treatments in cancer is enlarging the care team to include molecular pathologists, interventional oncologists, geriatric oncologists, palliative care providers, and patient supportive care staff such as financial advocates, lay navigators, and home-healthcare providers. It’s clear that to deliver 21st century cancer care, breaking down siloes is not only essential, but salient for the future of patient care.”

Read the full press release.

Watch an interview with McBride from the ACCC annual meeting.