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Daniel Kantor, MD, on Specialty Pharmacy in Multiple Sclerosis

In the last two decades we've seen really an explosion of the treatments we have for multiple sclerosis (MS), said Daniel Kantor, MD, medical director, Neurologique, immediate past president, Florida Society of Neurology.

“In the last two decades we’ve seen really an explosion of the treatments we have for multiple sclerosis (MS),” said Daniel Kantor, MD, medical director, Neurologique, immediate past president, Florida Society of Neurology. Until recently, self-injectables and intravenous medications were the only treatment options available for patients diagnosed with MS making specialty pharmacy, “hugely important for the treatment of MS.” Today, there are 10 disease-modifying agents approved by the US Food and Drug Administration:

  • Aubagio (teriflunomide)
  • Avonex (interferon beta-1a)
  • Betaseron (interferon beta-1b)
  • Copaxone (glatiramer acetate)
  • Extavia (interferon beta-1b)
  • Gilenya (fingolimod)
  • Novantrone (mitoxantrone)
  • Rebif (interferon beta-1a)
  • Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate)
  • Tysabri (natalizumab)

Dr Kantor notes that specialty pharmacies ensure facilities and patients receive medications in a timely manner. Specialty pharmacies also play a crucial role in both patient education and adherence.

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