Dr Lawrence F. Eichenfield on Advancements in Atopic Dermatitis Among Adolescents

April 25, 2021

Patients want better control of their atopic dermatitis, and we don’t want them to acquiesce to their disease, explained Lawrence F. Eichenfield, MD, chief of pediatric and adolescent dermatology at Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego.

Patients want better control of their atopic dermatitis, and we don’t want them to acquiesce to their disease, explained Lawrence F. Eichenfield, MD, chief of pediatric and adolescent dermatology at Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego and vice-chair and professor of dermatology and pediatrics at UC San Diego School of Medicine, in an interview ahead of this year’s American Academy of Dermatology Virtual Meeting Experience (AAD VMX). He is first author of the poster, “Efficacy and Safety of Ruxolitinib Cream Among Adolescents With Atopic Dermatitis: Pooled Results From Two Phase 3 Studies,” presented at AAD VMX.

Transcript

How will your study inform the unique treatment needs of atopic dermatitis among adolescents?

There's this tremendous variation in severity, both in terms of the rash and itch of atopic dermatitis. We have a history of broad use of topical corticosteroids, but we also have incredible history of concerns about side effects with topical corticosteroids. In some cases, this is just phobia about concern. But also there are these incredible variations in strength in topical corticosteroids, and you can get skin thinning or too much systemic exposure.

We've had other nonsteroidal ointments and creams that have been used for atopic dermatitis, and ruxolitinib seems to come in with very, very nice efficacy data. It may be much stronger in atopic dermatitis, in terms of its efficacy results using the objective measures that we discuss, as well as impact on itch. And if it can do this with very good tolerance, meaning without stinging and burning, I think it can be something that can really help to fulfill improved disease control.

One of the big gaps we have is that there are a lot of patients who sort of acquiesce to their disease or they use stuff when they need to because they're concerned about using too much, as part of the messaging that they've received about their topical medication. People really want better control, and they'd like long-term disease control with safety attached to it. And I think that this data set, specifically in adolescents, goes a long way to helping us to consider how this would fit into potential therapy for teens in the future.