Heart Failure Rates Fell From 2000-2010

The incidence rate for heart failure dropped steeply over a decade in a population-based study, and while hospitalization rates remained steady over time, causes shifted from cardiovascular to noncardiovascular.

The incidence rate for heart failure dropped steeply over a decade in a population-based study, and while hospitalization rates remained steady over time, causes shifted from cardiovascular to noncardiovascular.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, frequently use Olmsted County in their state for epidemiological studies because medical care for the most part is provided through the Mayo system. That gives them access to most medical records from both inpatient and outpatient sources. In this study, Yariv Gerber, PhD, and colleagues tracked heart failure incidence in the county between 2000 and 2010 and outcomes at a mean 4.5 years of follow-up. The analysis broke heart failure into 2 groups: preserved (ejection fraction of 50% or greater) and reduced (less than 50%).

Read more at Cardiovascular Business: http://bit.ly/1HkQHCm