New IQVIA, JDRF Platform Will Use Real-World Data to Address T1D Diagnosis Gaps

July 24, 2020

IQVIA, a health information technology and clinical research company, recently announced a new collaboration with JDRF, the world’s largest nonprofit funder of type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. Together, the companies plan to develop a real-world research platform to facilitate evidence generation for T1D via non-identified patient-level data and analytics.

IQVIA, a health information technology and clinical research company, recently announced a new collaboration with JDRF, the world’s largest nonprofit funder of type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. Together, the companies plan to develop a real-world research platform to facilitate evidence generation for T1D via non-identified patient-level data and analytics.

Over one-third (38%) of individuals over the age of 30 who are initially diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) actually have T1D, an April 2019 study found; meaning many T1D patients spend years making lifestyle changes instead of receiving the medical interventions they need from the disease’s onset. The study also revealed patients progressing to insulin within 3 years of diabetes diagnosis have a high likelihood of having T1D, regardless of initial diagnosis.

“While people with T2D may eventually need insulin, their treatment and education is very different from type 1,” said Nick Thomas, a lead author of the study. “If people with T1D don’t receive insulin they can develop very high blood glucose and may develop a life-threatening condition called ketoacidosis. This means having the right diagnosis is vitally important even if insulin treatment has already been started."

Recent research has made gains in better identifying T1D, especially in children. In a separate study published in Diabetologia, researchers found that children younger than 7 years diagnosed with T1D have a different endotype from those diagnosed at 13 years or older. Specifically, the study analyzed pancreas samples derived from child participants and revealed distinct patterns of proinsulin localization that were not as evident in older individuals.

T1D has historically been defined by autoimmune or idiopathic beta cell destruction leading to severe insulin deficiency; however, this etiopathological definition can be difficult to apply in clinical practice. As a result, no evidence-based guidance on identifying T1D in later life exists.

“Nearly 50% of the newly diagnosed individuals with T1D are 18 years or older,” said Sanjoy Dutta, vice president of research at JDRF. “Yet often adults with T1D are misdiagnosed as T2D, and it may take up to several years before they are properly diagnosed.”

The new platform aims to address this area of unmet need, so as to improve diagnostic accuracy. The information will also aid in assessing the impact of treatments and monitoring devices on outcomes, and optimize future drug development efforts for the T1D population.

“This first project, accurate diabetes diagnosis in adults, will provide the foundation for building a deeper and even more meaningful collaboration with the JDRF,” said Jon Morris, vice president and general manager of healthcare solutions at IQVIA. “The goal is to translate the learnings from this study into clinical practice to help ensure adults with T1D are accurately diagnosed and get the right treatment right away,” Morris explained in an email to The American Journal of Managed Care®.

IQVIA was created in 2016 when Quintiles merged with IMS Health. The company specializes in Human Data Science, defined as “the integration of data science, technology, and human science.” Currently, IQVIA works with the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Muscular Dystrophy Association, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, and the Epilepsy Foundation, among others.

IQVIA partners with healthcare companies, governments, and non-governmental organizations to promote global public health via their IQVIA CORE tool. According to the company website, CORE utilization can lead to reduced trial times, increased enrollment speed, and optimized dosages, in addition to other data management benefits.

“By integrating unparalleled data, advanced analytics, transformative technology, and domain expertise across our business, the CORE enables customers to make decisions with confidence,” IQVIA states.

Data included in the new platform will be amassed from US ambulatory electronic medical records of 5.1 million people with diabetes over the past 5 years, collected from more than 100,000 physicians; 60% of whom are specialists treating diabetes, while the remaining 40% are primary care providers, Morris explained.

IQVIA and JDRF’s combination of “advanced analytics with unparalleled data and deep domain expertise,” will assist in moving both the care and eventual cure of diabetes forward for individuals of all ages.

“This first project with JDRF…will lay the foundation for a series of clinical research collaborations utilizing IQVIA’s real world data and analytical expertise to derive insights about T1D,” Morris said.

Reference

Thomas NJ, Lynam AL, Hill AV, et al. Type 1 diabetes defined by severe insulin deficiency occurs after 30 years of age and is commonly treated as type 2 diabetes. Diabetologia. 2019;62:1167-1172. doi:10.1007/s00125-019-4863-8