CME/CE QUIZ

Supplements and Featured Publications, Hepatitis C Update: Strategies for Treatment, Compliance, and Long-term Health, Volume 11, Issue 10 Suppl

TAKE THE TESTCME/CE QUIZ

Hepatitis C Update: Strategies for Treatment, Compliance, and Long-term Health

Continuing Medical Education Accreditation

The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 2 Category 1 credits toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those hours that he/she actually spends in the educational activity.

The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to sponsor medical education for physicians.

Continuing Pharmacy Education Accreditation

Pharmacy Times

/Ascend Media Office of Continuing Professional Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. This program is approved for 2 contact hours (0.2 CEUs) under the ACPE universal program number of 290-999-05-018-H01.

Instructions

After reading "Hepatitis C Update: Strategies for Treatment, Compliance, and Long-term Health," complete the program evaluation and select the 1 best answer to each of the following questions. A statement of continuing education hours will be mailed to those who successfully complete (with a minimum score of 70%) the examination at the conclusion of the program.

CME/CE QUESTIONS

1. A national survey with testing for anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody indicates that the overall prevalence of exposure to HCV in the United States is:

  • 1.0%
  • 3.9%

2. Progression from acute to chronic infection in individuals acutely infected with HCV occurs at a rate of:

  • 30% to 35%
  • 50% to 85%

3. Over the past 25 years, the number of new cases of HCV infection per year has:

  • Increased slightly
  • Decreased significantly

4. The percentage of individuals with chronic HCV infection and cirrhosis who will develop hepatocellular carcinoma each year is approximately:

  • 1% to 4%
  • 20%

5. All of the following reasons account for the next decade's anticipated increase in morbidity and mortality due to HCV-related cirrhosis EXCEPT:

  • Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-HCV coinfections living longer
  • Failure to diagnose and treat HCV infection before liver damage is advanced

6. In the major clinical trials with the 2 main anti-HCV agents, the main indicator of efficacy has been:

  • Quality of life
  • HCV serum antibody levels and liver enzymes

7. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends routine screening of HCV infection in all of the following groups EXCEPT:

  • Individuals who have ever injected illegal drugs
  • Those who received blood/organs before July 1992

8. An SVR is defined as:

  • A 100-fold reduction in anti-HCV antibody at the end of drug therapy
  • Absence of HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) in serum at end of treatment and 6 months later

9. The major risk factor for HCV infection in the United States today is:

  • Sexual transmission
  • Poor hygiene and water-borne transmission

10. In the whole patient population infected with HCV, the typical SVR with combination therapy with pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin is:

  • Approximately 35%
  • Approximately 80%

11. In the United States, genotype 1 of HCV is:

  • Less common than genotype 2/3, and harder to treat
  • Less common than genotype 2/3, and easier to treat

12. In patients with HCV genotype 1 infections, guidelines suggest testing HCV RNA at week 12 because this result:

  • Must be used to adjust dosage
  • Provides useful epidemiologic information on viral mutation patterns

13. Adherence to drug therapy (eg, taking at least 80% of doses for at least 80% of days) has been shown to boost the SVR by about:

  • 10%
  • 50%

14. One of the major side effects of ribavirin therapy is:

  • Fever
  • Depression

15. Managing HCV infection in black Americans is difficult because:

  • This group tends to have the harder-to-treat genotype
  • All of the above

16. Managing HCV infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is challenging because:

  • The anti-HIV drugs may harm the liver
  • All of the above

17. In a patient presenting with severe depression and HCV, anti-HCV combination therapy is:

  • Contraindicated (interferon)
  • Both a and c

18. Routine blood tests at weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, etc are a critical part of combination therapy mainly to test for:

  • HCV RNA
  • C-reactive protein levels

19. Although all patients with chronic HCV infection are potential candidates for antiviral therapy, the main targets of therapy are:

  • Those with no evidence of fibrosis or inflammation on liver biopsy
  • Those with advanced liver decompensation and active alcohol abuse

20. In patients who do not respond to initial anti-HCV therapy, the best chance for success with retreatment is seen in those:

  • With excellent adherence
  • Who had received combination therapy

For Pharmacists

ANSWER CARD INSTRUCTIONS

Testing and Grading Procedures

1. Each participant achieving a passing grade of 70% or higher on any examination will receive an official computer form stating the number of CE credits earned. This form should be safeguarded and may be used as documentation of credits earned.

2. Participants receiving a failing grade on any exam will be notified and permitted to take 1 reexamination at no cost.

3. All answers should be recorded on the answer form. Please print clearly to ensure receipt of CE credit.

Pharmacy Times,

4. To receive credit certification electronically, please provide your e-mail address. Detach and mail completed exam form with your $10.00 payment to 405 Glenn Drive, Suite 4, Sterling, VA 20164-4432; or fax to 703-404-1801.

5. Take the test online for FREE at www.pharmacytimes.com and receive immediate grading and CE credits, and download your CE statement of credit.

Please photocopy the test form for additional test takers.

Pharmacy Times

/Ascend Media Office of Continuing Professional Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. This program is approved for 2 contact hours (0.2 CEUs) under the ACPE universal program number of 290-999-05-018-H01. The program is available for CE credit through October 1, 2006.

Answer card and evaluation form for Pharmacists follow on page S311.

GOAL

To provide participants with current information on the treatment of hepatitis C, including compliance issues, impact on special populations, and outlook for long-term health.

TARGET AUDIENCE

This activity is intended for pharmacists, pharmacy directors, physicians, infectious disease specialists, medical directors, public health officials, and other managed care decision makers.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

After participating in this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Define ways to expand and improve services to patients with hepatitis C.

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION ACCREDITATION

The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine designates this activity for a maximum of 2 Category 1 credits toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those hours that he/she actually spends in this educational activity.

The University of Cincinnati College of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to sponsor medical education for physicians. Release Date: October 6, 2005. Expiration Date: October 1, 2006.

CONTINUING PHARMACY EDUCATION ACCREDITATION

Pharmacy Times

/Ascend Media Office of Continuing Professional Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. This program is approved for 2 contact hours (0.2 CEUs) under the ACPE universal program number of 290-999-05-018-H01. Release Date: October 6, 2005. Expiration Date: October 1, 2006.

FUNDING

This program is supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Schering-Plough Corporation.