Robin Shah Outlines OneOncology's Use of Market-Research Information to Prioritize Value-Based Care

November 20, 2019

Using market-research information builds comprehension of the communities OneOncology treats, which allows us to implement effective technologies for value-based care, said Robin Shah, chief commercial officer of OneOncology.

Using market-research information builds comprehension of the communities OneOncology treats, which allows us to implement effective technologies for value-based care, said Robin Shah, chief commercial officer of OneOncology.

Transcript

With a shift toward value-based care, there’s an emphasis placed on the standardization of care, but this can be hard for community oncologists who see a range of different types of cancer. Does the technology OneOncology uses help address this?

With the work that we’re doing with our physician leadership at OneCouncil, we’re building a platform so that we can, 1, understand what technology is needed to be successful in a value-based program and then how do you deploy that technology. So, the way we think about it is you need to understand the parameters of what program you’re going into, and then build software and solutions, operational, that can help a practice succeed in a value-based program. So, we’ve built an entire clinical and operational team thinking about that together.

Does artificial intelligence or machine learning play a part, or will it play a part in the future, in helping drive appropriate care?

We’re in the very early stages of using machine learning for driving value in alternative models, but we are starting some of that. One of the things that we’re learning is that with the wealth of data, you can start to learn where you can make process improvement changes, but this starts with building the data asset. So, with all the work that we’re building towards building OneAnalytics, we think in the future as we really go into risk-based contracts across our entire network, we’ll be able to use some type of machine learning with a partner like Flatiron or others.

How is this technology helping community oncologists stay competitive in a growing consolidating market?

So, as we think about software in the community space, a lot of what we’re adding to our platform is market-research information. So, not only do we think about software and data to help our practices be better, but how do we learn more about the communities that we’re in, how do we learn about the places where cancer patients are actually coming from, and how do our practices collaborate and build models where those patients can understand what services are provided within our communities. So, with the competitive landscape across the entire country, it’s important to look at the entire community and not just the technology that we’re using within our clinics.