Room for Collaboration Between Health Care and Education Systems

The authors of a Commentary in the February 2021 issue of The American Journal of Managed Care® discuss the opportunities for the health care and education systems to cooperate in value-based contracts to improve outcomes for students.

With the growth of alternative payment models and value-based contracting, policy makers and researchers are looking to other sectors that offer the potential for cooperation with the health care system, including education. Schools and health care organizations are a natural fit to work together to improve outcomes for children, but value-based alignment between the 2 systems will require the development of both contracting mechanisms and a foundation of trust.

On this episode of Managed Care Cast, we’re talking with two coauthors of a commentary published in our February 2021 issue. The commentary, “Achieving Better Value in Pediatric Care: School Systems as Clinical and Financial Partners?”, explains the opportunities for the health care and education systems to cooperate in value-based contracts to improve outcomes for students, as well as how this goal may be affected by the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.

The authors joining us today are Venus Wong, PhD, of the Clinical Excellence and Research Center at Stanford University, and Hoangmai Pham, MD, MPH, of Institute for Exceptional Care.

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