What We're Reading: 3 Million US COVID-19 Cases; US Withdraws From WHO; HIV Long-Acting Injectable

July 8, 2020

With more states reporting record numbers of new infections of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the United States has surpassed 3 million confirmed cases; the Trump administration has notified the United Nations that it will be withdrawing from the World Health Organization (WHO); a new injectable given to patients every 2 months can protect against HIV better than the commonly used daily pill.

COVID-19 Infections Top 3 Million in United States

With more states reporting record numbers of new infections of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the United States has surpassed 3 million confirmed cases, according to Reuters. California, Hawaii, Idaho, Missouri, Montana, Oklahoma, and Texas all easily surpassed previous daily records for new cases, and Texas and California each had more than 10,000. The rise in cases has led to more Americans seeking COVID-19 screenings, and HHS has added short-term testing sites in Florida, Louisiana, and Texas.

Trump Administration Begins Withdrawal From WHO

The Trump administration has notified the United Nations that it will be withdrawing from the World Health Organization (WHO) over its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Associated Press reported that health officials and critics of the administration blasted the move, saying it would cost the United States influence globally. The withdrawal would not take effect until next year and if former Vice President Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, wins in the November election, he could rescind the decision.

New HIV Injectable May Be More Effective Than Daily Pill

A new injectable given to patients every 2 months can protect against HIV better than the commonly used daily pill, according to researchers. The high price for daily HIV prevention pills like Truvada and Descovy has highlighted the need for other prevention options, The New York Times reported. The trial evaluating the long-acting injectable, cabotegravir, was stopped in May after an interim analysis showed it was highly effective. The shot taken every 2 months was 66% more effective than Truvada.