Debra Madden

Debra Madden is a 2-time cancer survivor who was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma as a young adult and breast cancer nearly 20 years later, which was thought to be secondary to the radiation she had received for her original cancer treatment. Debra became an active Cancer Research Advocate following her second cancer diagnosis at the age of 42 years. She is currently a member of the ECOG/ACRIN Cancer Research Group and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's Advisory Panel on the Assessment of Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options. She also serves on multiple grant review panels, including the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program Breast Cancer Research Program. Debra blogs at "Musings of a Cancer Research Advocate", (https://draemadden.wordpress.com/) and you can follow her on Twitter at @AdvocateDebM.

Articles

The Promise of Cancer Immunotherapy: Why Patient Education Is Critical, Part II

April 05, 2016

It is imperative that we gather more mature data on a much larger number of patients to accurately assess efficacy, safety, potential harms, durability of response, and impact on disease progression and overall survival of the new immunotherapy treatments.

The Promise of Cancer Immunotherapy: Why Patient Education Is Critical, Part I

March 29, 2016

It is imperative that we gather more mature data on a much larger number of patients to accurately assess efficacy, safety, potential harms, durability of response, and impact on disease progression and overall survival of the new immunotherapy treatments.

First Do No Harm: HER2-Positive Breast Cancer, Trastuzumab, and Cardiac Monitoring Guidelines: Part 2

July 08, 2015

In part 1 of "First Do No Harm," Ms Madden noted important new research suggesting that the majority of patients with HER2+ breast cancer who are treated with the anti-HER2 agent trastuzumab do not receive sufficient cardiac monitoring. In part 2, she discusses the implications of this recent study for patients with this aggressive form of breast cancer and protective strategies against preventable harms of their treatment.

First Do No Harm: HER2-Positive Breast Cancer, Trastuzumab, and Cardiac Monitoring Guidelines

July 02, 2015

With a growing understanding of the risk of cardiotoxicity associated with cancer treatment, cardio-oncology has emerged as an important subspecialty, resulting in the establishment of cardio-oncology programs most often based at or in collaboration with comprehensive cancer centers.