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National Association of Managed Care Physicians Fall Forum 2019

What Do Physicians Really Think of Quality Metrics, and What's Needed to Drive Better Performance?

There’s a question as to whether these metrics actually translate into what’s actually driving quality care, explained Loren Meyer, MD, president of HCA Physician Services, during a session at the National Association of Managed Care Physicians 2019 Fall Managed Care Forum being held October 10-11 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
It’s no secret that physicians are spread thin trying to deliver care. In addition to the traditional role of caring for their patients, there has more recently been the addition of measuring quality outcomes.

And, there’s question as to whether these metrics actually translate into what’s actually driving quality care, explained Loren Meyer, MD, president of HCA Physician Services, during a session at the National Association of Managed Care Physicians 2019 Fall Managed Care Forum being held October 10-11 in Las Vegas, Nevada.

For example, said Meyer, the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set, which is implemented by the National Committee for Quality Assurance, is a tool used by more than 90% of insurers to measure performance. The set, which includes 81 measures across 5 domains of care, are meant to compare health plan performances but are now being used to compare practices, and many of these measures may not be applicable, according to Meyer.

“We know at the macro level that we have a lot of opportunity, but for me the question comes back down to what’s going on at the local level?” said Meyer, explaining that it’s essential to know how providers are responding and adapting to these quality measures.

In order to find out just that, HCA Physician Services constructed a survey through Survey Monkey in June that surveyed employed physicians across markets in 7 states—Colorado, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, Minnesota, and New Hampshire.

There were 132 responses—a 24% response rate—consisting of primary care providers, medical subspecialists, and surgical specialists. Of the responses, the majority came from primary care providers, followed by surgical specialists and then medical specialists. The majority of respondents had been in practice for more than 20 years.

The survey revealed that physicians are pretty interested in achieving high-level performance on clinical quality metrics. On a scale of 1-10, there was an interest level of 7. Digging deeper, the survey asked respondents to rank 4 drivers of interest from the most influential to least influential. Driving high quality care was the main catalyst, the researchers found. 

“They believe in metrics, they understand the relationship between what’s being measured to and the care of their patient population,” said Meyer, reflecting on the results.

Meanwhile, the other 3 drivers—desire to excel on metrics associated with my practice, reducing national healthcare expenditures, and personal financial incentives—had mixed rankings.


 
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