Currently Viewing:
In Focus Blog
Currently Reading
Slow Uptake Among Physicians of Effective Antibiotics to Treat Superbugs
August 27, 2019 – Laura Joszt
CMS Announces Star Ratings Will Expand to ACA Health Plans
August 16, 2019 – Laura Joszt
Study Questions Penalizing, Incentivizing PCPs for Readmission Rates
May 21, 2019 – Laura Joszt
Patients at "D" or "F" Hospitals Face 92% Greater Risk of Avoidable Death, Report Finds
May 15, 2019 – Samantha DiGrande
The Race Against Antibiotic Resistance: Addressing a Growing Public Health Crisis
April 12, 2019 – Laura Joszt
High Healthcare Use Associated With Lower Prices, Report Finds
March 12, 2019 – Mary Caffrey
Rise of Marijuana Cries Out for Research, Regulation, Physicians Say
January 07, 2019 – Mary Caffrey
Is 2019 the Year Healthcare Becomes Consumer Friendly?
January 03, 2019 – Allison Inserro
Sanofi Pivotal Trial to Target Driver of Cyst Growth in PKD
November 12, 2018 – Mary Caffrey

Slow Uptake Among Physicians of Effective Antibiotics to Treat Superbugs

Laura Joszt
New and effective antibiotics are rarely prescribed in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections, which are a family of the most drug-resistant bacteria.
As a growing number of infections become resistant to antibiotic medications, it is becoming crucially important that providers not only practice antibiotic stewardship but also use effective antibiotics when they are needed. However, a new study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases1 found that new and effective antibiotics are rarely prescribed in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections, which are a family of the most drug-resistant bacteria.

The World Health Organization recently ranked antibiotic resistance as one of the top 10 global health threats in 2019. CDC estimates that 2 million Americans are infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria every year and at least 23,000 people die from the bacteria.

The new research showed that effective antibiotics are only being used in one-fourth of CRE infections, indicating a slow uptake of such high-priority antibiotics. The findings have led the authors to call for additional research into behavioral and economic factors impacting the use of these new antibiotics.

"The infectious diseases community spent the past decade saying, 'We need new antibiotics, this is a top priority,' and now we're at risk of sounding like the boy who cried wolf," lead author Cornelius J. Clancy, MD, associate professor of medicine and director of the mycology program and XDR Pathogen Laboratory in the University of Pittsburgh's Division of Infectious Diseases, said in a statement. "We have a responsibility to learn why it takes so long for antibiotics to be adopted into practice and figure out what we need to do to ensure the best antibiotics quickly reach the patients who desperately need them."

Clancy and his team surveyed hospital-based pharmacists in the US regarding their antibiotic positioning against CRE infections. They used IQVIA prescription data and Driving Re-investment in Research and Development and Responsible Antibiotic Use estimates to determine the number of all infections and CRE infections treated with different antibiotics in the United States.

They were looking to compare the intravenous use of polymyxins, the longstanding first-line antibiotics against CRE infections, with the newer agents of ceftazidime-avibactam, meropenem-vaborbactam, and plazomicin, which have been found to be more effective and less toxic.

The data showed that polymyxins remained widely used. In cases in which the newer agents should constitute first-line treatment, the 3 newer agents were only used in about 35% of CRE infections (ranging from 23% to 62%). These findings come 4 years after the FDA approved ceftazidime-avibactam, which was the first of the new agents.

The authors admitted that costs likely constrained some use since, in 75-kilogram adults, the wholesale acquisition costs for a 14-day course of the agents were $15,070 for ceftazidime-avibactam, $13,860 for meropenem-vaborbactam, and $13,320 for plazomicin.



Related Articles

CDC Promotes Safe Antibiotic Prescribing and Use Through Educational Effort
Urgent Care Centers Often Prescribe Unnecessary Antibiotics
Doctors More Likely to Overprescribe Antibiotics for Children During Telemedicine Visits
The Race Against Antibiotic Resistance: Addressing a Growing Public Health Crisis
 
Copyright AJMC 2006-2020 Clinical Care Targeted Communications Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
x
Welcome the the new and improved AJMC.com, the premier managed market network. Tell us about yourself so that we can serve you better.
Sign Up