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Relationship Between Patient Satisfaction With Inpatient Care and Hospital Readmission Within 30 Days
William Boulding, PhD; Seth W. Glickman, MD, MBA; Matthew P. Manary, MSE; Kevin A. Schulman, MD; and Richard Staelin, PhD
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Relationship Between Patient Satisfaction With Inpatient Care and Hospital Readmission Within 30 Days

William Boulding, PhD; Seth W. Glickman, MD, MBA; Matthew P. Manary, MSE; Kevin A. Schulman, MD; and Richard Staelin, PhD

Higher overall patient satisfaction with inpatient care and discharge planning is associated with lower 30-day readmission rates after adjusting for clinical quality.

Fifth, one could infer that the association between patient satisfaction and outcomes can be explained by healthier patients’ being more likely to report being satisfied.24 However, this is unlikely because the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services corrected for this before releasing their data.

Sixth, the period for the satisfaction data (2008) is not entirely contemporaneous with that for the clinical data and the outcome data (2005-2008). This was owing to pragmatic reasons associated with the availability of data. However, when we compared the 2009 satisfaction measures with the 2008 measures, we found no time trend and a correlation of 0.86 between the 2 yearly hospital-level measures, indicating that they were stable (reliable) and a good proxy for the 2 prior years.

In conclusion, higher hospital-level overall patient satisfaction and patient satisfaction with discharge planning are associated with lower 30-day risk-standardized readmission rates after adjustment for clinical quality. Although patients may have little insight into evidence-based medicine, they can assess other aspects of care that are associated with  better health outcomes. Therefore, patient-reported information about hospital performance can have an important role in the evaluation and management of hospital quality.

Author Affiliations: From The Fuqua School of Business (WB, MPM, RS), the Duke Clinical Research Institute (SWG, KAS), and the School of Medicine (SWG, KAS), Duke University, Durham, NC; and the Department of Emergency Medicine (SWG), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

 

Funding Source: The authors report no external funding for this study.

 

Author Disclosures: Dr Glickman reports receiving support through a Physician Faculty Scholar Award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The other authors (WB, MPM, KAS, RS) report no relationship or financial interest with any entity that would pose a conflict of interest with the subject matter of this article.

 

Authorship Information: Concept and design (WB, SWG, KAS, RS); acquisition of data (MPM); analysis and interpretation of data (WB, SWG, MPM, RS); drafting of the manuscript (SWG, MPM, RS); critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content (WB, SWG, KAS, RS); statistical analysis (WB, MPM, RS); administrative, technical, and logistic support (WB, KAS, RS); and supervision (WB).

 

Address correspondence to: Seth W. Glickman, MD, MBA, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 170 Manning Dr, CB #7594, Chapel Hill, NC 27599. E-mail: seth_glickman@med.unc.edu.

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