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Most Read Journal Articles (So Far) in 2017

Laura Joszt
With half a year behind us, The American Journal of Managed Care® (AJMC®) is reflecting back on the journal articles published through all journals in the franchise over the first half of 2017. The topics of interest ranged from alternative payment models to yoga and all focused on providing better care and better outcomes for patients.
With half a year behind us, The American Journal of Managed Care® (AJMC®) is reflecting back on the journal articles published through all journals in the franchise over the first half of 2017. The topics of interest ranged from alternative payment models to yoga and all focused on providing better care and better outcomes for patients.
 
10. Can Yoga, Mindfulness Fit With Managed Care?
This article from Evidence-Based Diabetes ManagementTM (EBDMTM) explored how studies have linked yoga and mindfulness with reduced stress, improved glycemic control, and even lower medical costs, but few health plans pay for yoga and mindfulness. Payment reforms in healthcare may help: the Affordable Care Act’s focus on preventive care and wellness raised yoga’s profile with payers. In addition, President Donald J. Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wisconsin)’s support for health savings accounts may allow more people to be able to pay for yoga.
 
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9. Why Oncologists Need Technology to Succeed in Alternative Payment Models
The emergence of alternative payment models is requiring oncologists to develop new solutions to meet the requirements of these programs. However, while people have focused on model design, care delivery reform, financial impact, and quality of care, there has been little discussion on practical aspects of how practices work. In Evidence-Based OncologyTM (EBOTM) authors from Flatiron Health offer their solution to how practices can utilize Flatiron’s electronic health record.
 
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8. The Challenge of Paying for Cost-Effective Cures
The US health system faces a challenge of paying for highly effective and cost-effective prescription drugs. Because they are highly effective, these drugs, based on a value-based system, are very expensive, but the US health system is fragmented, which doesn’t incentivize payers to pay these high prices for cures. Authors in this article from AJMC® suggest mechanisms that can help spread the burden of financing cures across payers.
 
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7. Value-Based Payment Models in Oncology: Will They Help or Hinder Patient Access to New Treatments?
In the April issue of EBOTM, authors from Deloitte highlighted the results from recent interviews of 18 individuals from health plans, provider groups, and clinical pathway developers to better understand what value-based payment models are working to help bring down the cost of treatments. They found that early experiments with value-based payment models show some progress, but there is still room for improvement.
 
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6. Treating Medicaid Patients With Hepatitis C: Clinical and Economic Impact
The high cost of new treatments for hepatitis C means they are often restricted in Medicaid patients. A study in AJMC® estimated the change in chronic hepatitis C and the economic burden associated with comprehensive treatment of patients in Medicaid with chronic hepatitis C. They determined that a “treat all” strategy resulted in a higher cure rate, substantial reductions in downstream negative clinical outcomes, and considerable cost savings.
 
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