Currently Viewing:
Newsroom
Currently Reading
Need for Switch to Incretins in T2D an Indicator of Pancreatic Cancer
January 30, 2017 – Surabhi Dangi-Garimella, PhD
This Week in Managed Care: January 27, 2017
January 27, 2017
NICE Endorses Funding for Ibrutinib in Patients With CLL
January 27, 2017 – AJMC Staff
Deaths From Diabetes May Be Three Times Higher Than Thought, Study Finds
January 27, 2017 – Mary Caffrey
First Trial With Universal CAR-T Treatment in Pediatric Leukemia Reports Success
January 26, 2017 – Surabhi Dangi-Garimella, PhD
Judge Blocks CMS Rule on Premium Assistance for Kidney Patients
January 26, 2017 – Mary Caffrey
New Target for Treating Glioblastoma May Increase Survival Time
January 26, 2017 – AJMC Staff
Study Doubts Impact of Pre-ACA Medicaid Expansion on Access to Cancer Surgery
January 25, 2017 – Surabhi Dangi-Garimella, PhD
JAMA Study Discovers Regional Trends in Cancer-Related Mortality
January 25, 2017 – Surabhi Dangi-Garimella, PhD

Need for Switch to Incretins in T2D an Indicator of Pancreatic Cancer

Surabhi Dangi-Garimella, PhD
A retrospective analysis of evidence from prescription data gathered in Belgium and Italy has found that uncontrolled diabetes might be an early sign of pancreatic cancer.
A retrospective analysis of evidence from prescription data gathered in Belgium and Italy has found that uncontrolled diabetes might be an early sign of pancreatic cancer—a disease that is difficult to diagnose in its early stages due to lack of symptoms.

The collaborative study, which was presented at the European Cancer Congress by Alice Koechlin, a researcher from the International Prevention Research Institute in Lyon, France, evaluated data on 368,377 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Belgium between 2008 and 2013, and 456,311 patients in Lombardy, Italy, between 2008 and 2012. During this time period, there were 885 new cases of pancreatic cancer in Belgium and 1872 new cases in Lombardy.

Koechlin told the audience that 50% of all the cases were diagnosed within a year of patients being diagnosed with, and treated for, type 2 diabetes. In Beligum, 25% of the patients were diagnosed within 90 days, while in Lombardy, the number stood at 18%.

When the authors looked at the subset of patients who were already on oral antidiabetic agents, there were signs that diabetes deteriorated faster among those who were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. This group of patients had been prescribed injectable treatments (incretins or insulin) for better control of their T2D. The researchers identified a 7-fold increase in the risk of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer among this group.

Koechlin told the audience that while the association between T2D and pancreatic cancer has been known, the challenge has been with identifying the cause-effect relation. Their study showed that incretin treatments are prescribed to T2D patients whose diabetes is caused by undiagnosed pancreatic cancer. She described this phenomenon as reverse causation.

“Our study also shows that the reverse causation observed for incretin drugs is also observed for other anti-diabetic therapies, in particular for insulin therapy,” Koechlin added.

Following the progress of an associated disease such as T2D in the absence of early biomarkers for the detection of pancreatic cancer—a disease that has a dismal 5-year survival rate of 8% in the United States—can help clinicians capture this disease early in patients.  

 
Copyright AJMC 2006-2019 Clinical Care Targeted Communications Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
x
Welcome the the new and improved AJMC.com, the premier managed market network. Tell us about yourself so that we can serve you better.
Sign Up