Currently Viewing:
Newsroom
Currently Reading
US Latino Population With Psoriasis Exposed to Heightened Disease Severity, Worse Quality of Life
January 08, 2020 – Matthew Gavidia
Study Examines Role of Fibroblast Growth Factors in Psoriasis, Metabolic Pathways
January 06, 2020 – Sara Karlovitch
Weekly Regimens of Physical, Cognitive Exercises Shown to Slightly Improve Symptoms of Parkinson Disease
December 29, 2019 – Matthew Gavidia
Janus Kinase Inhibitors Successfully Combat Psoriasis, Inflammatory Diseases, Review Finds
December 29, 2019 – Gianna Melillo
Redefining Special Cases of Psoriasis Severity
December 20, 2019 – Alison Rodriguez
Bimekizumab Beats Adalimumab in Phase 3 Psoriasis Study
December 18, 2019 – AJMC Staff
Defective Stem Cell Behavior Linked to Psoriasis
December 14, 2019 – AJMC Staff
Probiotics May Have an Impact on Psoriasis
December 13, 2019 – Gianna Melillo
Research Finds Sex Differences in Links Between Psoriasis and Metabolic Disorders
December 07, 2019 – AJMC Staff

US Latino Population With Psoriasis Exposed to Heightened Disease Severity, Worse Quality of Life

Matthew Gavidia
While prevalence rates of psoriasis are lower among the Latino population compared with the white and black populations in the United States, Latinos are shown to be disproportionately affected by poorer quality of life and intensified disease severity, according to study findings.
While prevalence rates of psoriasis are lower among the Latino population compared with the white and black populations in the United States, Latinos are shown to be disproportionately affected by poorer quality of life and intensified disease severity, according to study findings published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.

Current evidence suggests that there are notable differences in the severity of psoriasis between racial and ethnic groups, but as the study authors note, there is little research on the various factors affecting disease severity in the rapidly growing US Latino population. To improve knowledge of psoriasis within this minority group, researchers conducted a review evaluating the current evidence on psoriasis in US Latinos, providing information on factors such as prevalence, severity, and quality of life.

Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Latinos were shown to have a reduced psoriasis prevalence (1.6%) compared with white (3.7%) and black (2%) patients. Although white patients have a higher prevalence of psoriasis, recent data has shown that individuals with darker skin may be more susceptible to more extensive disease involvement, thicker plaques, and more scale than those with lighter skin.

Compared with white patients, psoriasis was found to affect the US Latino population with more disease severity and a greater quality-of-life impact, which study authors wrote may be attributed to delayed diagnosis and being less likely to seek or receive care for the disease. Medications tailored toward psoriasis showed a noninferior or better response to systemic treatments among Latino cohorts, indicating the potential significance of treatment accessibility and willingness to seek care.

Latinos with psoriasis additionally exhibited higher rates of comorbidities, such as depression, obesity, and diabetes, compared with white patients, which may contribute to the reduced quality-of-life findings.

Researchers speculated that the lack of information on psoriasis within the Latino population may be related to cultural, socioeconomic, and educational barriers to care and clinical trial participation. “Many confounding variables, such as independently high rates of Latino obesity, also impact the reported severity of disease and the resulting comorbidity data available,” they wrote.

The study authors also noted that future studies that reflect the growing proportion of minorities in the United States may assist in bridging the gap of knowledge and improve care within communities, as well as employing techniques to boost clinical trial participation. “Learning unique Latino cultural considerations and overcoming logistical challenges, such as providing Spanish translators and Spanish educational materials, and offering after-hours clinics may begin to address solutions within the scope of our field,” the authors wrote.

Reference

Ashbaugh AG, Ekelem C, Landaverde Y, et al. Psoriatic disease in the US Latino population: a comprehensive review [published online December 16, 2019]. Am J Clin Dermatol. doi: 10.1007/s40257-019-00498-8.

 
Copyright AJMC 2006-2020 Clinical Care Targeted Communications Group, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
x
Welcome the the new and improved AJMC.com, the premier managed market network. Tell us about yourself so that we can serve you better.
Sign Up