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What We're Reading: Debate Over Medicaid Expansion; Medicare for All Briefings; Lawsuits Over Juul Device

AJMC Staff
HHS Secretary Alex Azar and CMS Administrator Seema Verma seem to be on the losing end of a debate with White House economic and finance officials about allowing a partial Medicaid expansion to stamp out growing calls to allow a full expansion; more than 60 House Democrats launched a Medicare for All caucus this month, a sign of the popularity surrounding the concept of a government-run health system; Juul Labs, maker of the tiny, USB-flash-drive-sized electronic cigarette, has been hit with 3 lawsuits so far that allege it is marketing its product to children and teenagers.

Health Officials Debate White House About Allowing Partial Medicaid Expansion

HHS Secretary Alex Azar and CMS Administrator Seema Verma seem to be on the losing end of a debate with White House economic and finance officials about allowing a partial Medicaid expansion to stamp out growing calls to allow a full expansion, according to The New York Times. A confidential memo obtained by the paper said there is “significant risk.” Utah, for instance, will move ahead with a full expansion if the administration does not approve a plan by the Republican governor there to allow a more limited expansion of Medicaid that would cover fewer people.



House Democrats Plan Briefings on Medicare for All

More than 60 House Democrats launched a Medicare for All caucus this month, a sign of the popularity surrounding the concept of a government-run health insurance system, The Hill reported. House action on the issue next year, if they regain control, would intensify the debate within the Democratic Party for 2020. The caucus plans to hold briefings with experts as part of its efforts to revise a previous bill that will act as the framework for future legislation to establish single-payer national health insurance.



Juul Labs, Maker of E-Cigarette Device Popular With Teens, Hit With Lawsuits 

Juul Labs, maker of the tiny, USB-flash-drive-sized electronic cigarette, has been hit with 3 lawsuits so far that allege it is marketing its product to children and teenagers, The Washington Post reported. The San Francisco–based company, which started in 2015, grew 7-fold in the United States and controls 68% of the market. The company has said the cases have no merit; researchers say that the company’s deceptive age verification technique and social media marketing campaigns illustrate their true intent.

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