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What We're Reading: Gene-Editing Babies; Maine Work Requirements; Trade Deal to Delay Generics

AJMC Staff
A new poll has found that most Americans support gene editing that is used to protect babies against diseases; Maine’s incoming governor, a Democrat, may be able to ignore the Medicaid work requirements the federal government just approved for the outgoing Republican governor; the new trade agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico includes language that could delay cheaper generics from reaching patients.

Americans Support Gene Editing to Protect Babies

A new poll has found that most Americans support gene editing that is used to protect babies against diseases. However, they don’t believe the technology should be used to make children smarter, faster, or taller, according to the Associated Press. Approximately 70% of Americans are in favor of using gene editing to prevent fatal or uncurable diseases and two-thirds find it acceptable to also use gene editing to protect against nonfatal conditions and reduce the risk of diseases developing later in life. The poll also found more Americans believe the government should not fund testing on human embryos to develop gene-editing technology.

 

New Maine Governor Could Scrap State’s Medicaid Work Requirements

Maine’s outgoing governor, Republican Paul LePage, was strongly opposed to Medicaid expansion, and after his state’s voters approved expansion at the polls, he got approval from the federal government to implement work requirements. According to the Portland Press Herald, the incoming governor, a Democrat, may be able to ignore those work requirements when she takes office. An expert suggested that just because the waiver was approved by the government, doesn’t mean Governor-elect Janet Mills has to follow it. Mills is currently evaluating the legal options available to her.

 

US–Canada–Mexico Trade Deal May Delay Generics

The new trade agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico included language that prevents generic copies of Canada and Mexico’s prescription drugs from reaching the market for at least a decade. The United States grants 12 years of market protection, while Canada grants 8 years and Mexico only 5 years. USA Today reported that some fear this agreement could delay efforts to get cheaper generics to patients. Congress still has to approve the trade agreement and House Democrats, who take the majority in January, are expected to demand changes to the drug provision and other parts of the trade deal.

 
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