AML, MF Remain Top Causes of Mortality Among Patients With MF Over Last 3 Decades

This finding, say the researchers of the study, suggests an ongoing need for research and novel therapies for patients with the rare disorder.

Over the last 3 decades, the risk of death from myelofibrosis (MF) has dropped significantly, according to new research presented at the European Hematology Association 2021 Virtual Congress. The research also showed that leading causes of death, including progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and infections, may be indirectly or directly related to MF progression and complications.

The latter finding, say the researchers of the study, suggests an ongoing need for research and novel therapies for patients with the rare disorder.

The researchers of the study abstract compared survival and mortality rates among nearly 1000 patients with MF between 1990 and 2020, dividing the patients into 2 groups:

  • Diagnosis of MF made before 2010 (n = 379)
  • Diagnosis of MF made after 2010 (n = 617)

There were over 1900 and 1600 person-years analyzed for the years during and before 2010 and after 2010, respectively, of which 205 (55%) and 100 (16%) patients died, respectively. Regardless of age and gender, mortality was significantly higher among patients who received their diagnosis during or prior to 2010.

Across all age groups—younger than 49 years, 50-59 years, 60-69 years, and older than 70 years—the risk of death was lower after 2010. Throughout the study period, AML was the leading cause of death, followed by MF for all age groups. Other causes of death included infections, vascular event or multi-organ failure (Vasc/MOF), and other unrelated medical conditions.

“However, when MF-related and possibly related causes of death (Vasc/MOF or MF progression/infections) were combined, this group was leading cause of mortality ≤ 2010, and was comparable to AML > 2010,” noted the researchers. “Cause-specific crude mortality has decreased > 2010 for all subcategories, except for AML, which remained unchanged between periods.”

In both periods, the risk of death increased with age, and males had higher rates of mortality than females, although the risk of death decreased for both genders after 2010. According to the researchers, the risk of death was higher for males for patients of all ages, with the exception of those aged under 49 years.

Reference

Masarova L, Bose P, Pemmaraju N, et al. Overall and cause specific changes in mortality of patients with myelofibrosis over the last 3 decades. Presented at: EHA2021 Virtual; June 9-17, 2021. Abstract #EP1096