Bimekizumab Beats Adalimumab in Phase 3 Psoriasis Study

December 18, 2019
AJMC Staff

The investigational therapy, an interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-17F inhibitor, is the third phase 3 study of bimekizumab to report positive results since October, following BE VIVID and BE READY, which evaluated the safety and efficacy of the drug.

A global phase 3 study, BE SURE, has announced that the bispecific antibody bimekizumab outperformed adalimumab (Humira, AbbVie) in both coprimary end points at week 16, while meeting all secondary end points that measure total skin clearance at 4 and 6 months.

BE SURE found that bimekizumab was superior to adalimumab in achieving 90% improvement in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI 90) and in Investigator Global Assessment (IGA) response of clear or almost clear (IGA 0/1). The pharmaceutical company UCB announced the results in a statement.

The investigational therapy, an interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-17F inhibitor, is the third phase 3 study of bimekizumab to report positive results since October, following BE VIVID and BE READY, which evaluated the safety and efficacy of the drug. BE SURE compared the tumor necrosis factor inhibitor adalimumab, one of the most popular therapies in the world, against an study drug that selectively targets 2 antigens in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis.

In this study, the initial treatment period of 24 weeks is followed by a dose-blind maintenance period until week 56. BE SURE enrolled 478 patients with for at least 6 months prior to screening who had psoriasis with an affected surface area of at least 10%, a PASI of a least 12, and an IGA score of at least 3 on a 5-point scale.

Bispecific antibodies, which have the ability to reach 2 therapeutic targets in a synergistic manner, have made news in recent weeks, as the investigational therapy mosunetuzumab was featured at the American Society of Hematology for its effectiveness against malignant B cells.

Bimekizumab is also being studied in psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis, with the first topline results expected at the end of 2021.