ChristianaCare Innovates Diabetes Care for Patients With Poorly Controlled Disease

February 9, 2021

On this episode of Managed Care Cast, we speak with experts from ChristianaCare, which implemented a diabetes pilot program at 4 of its primary care sites in 2019 and saw its population of patients with well-controlled disease grow by 16%.

According to the CDC’s 2020 National Diabetes Statistics Report, 34.2 million Americans have diabetes, 88 million adults have prediabetes, and type 1 and type 2 are both increasing in incidence among younger individuals.

On this episode of Managed Care Cast, we speak with experts from ChristianaCare, one of the largest health care providers in the mid-Atlantic region, serving patients in Delaware and parts of Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.

Hoping to increase the percentage of their patients with diabetes who have a hemoglobin A1C of 9% or lower, in 2019, ChristianaCare implemented a diabetes pilot program at 4 of its primary care sites, partnering each site with an endocrinologist and embedding a behavioral counselor at Primary Care Concord in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. With an original goal of growing this patient group by 10% by July of 2019, they instead saw 16% growth.

Marina V. Zeltser, MD, MBA, assistant chief medical information officer for population health and director of population health analytics at ChristianaCare; Raymond Carter, MD, clinical leader of primary care at Primary Care Concord; and Edward Feuer, MA, the behavioral health counselor embedded at Dr Carter’s practice sat down with us to discuss the pilot program, the team-based approach with results that exceeded ChristianaCare’s original goals, and how they would like to see the program expand going forward.

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