Consumption of Processed Meat May Increase the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Some

Dietary factors, including meat, fruits, vegetables and fiber, are associated with colorectal cancer; however, there is limited information as to whether these dietary factors interact with genetic variants to modify risk of colorectal cancer. In this study, the authors conducted genome-wide association studies between genetic variants, diet, and the susceptibility to colorectal cancer.

High intake of red and processed meat and low intake of fruits, vegetables and fiber are associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer. The authors investigated if the effect of these dietary factors on colorectal cancer risk is modified by common genetic variants across the genome (total of about 2.7 million genetic variants), also known as gene-diet interactions.

Studying over 9,000 colorectal cancer cases and 9,000 controls that were not diagnosed with colorectal cancer, the results provide strong evidence for a gene-diet interaction and colorectal cancer risk between a genetic variant (rs4143094) on chromosome 10p14 near the gene

and processed meat consumption (p = 8.7E-09). This genetic locus may have interesting biological significance given its location in the genome.

The results suggest that genetic variants may interact with diet and in combination affect colorectal cancer risk, which may have important implications for personalized cancer care and provide novel insights into prevention strategies.

Read the published research here:

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Source: PLoS Genetics