Dr David Kingdon Describes Reactions to Increasing Use of CBT for Psychosis

July 15, 2019

David Kingdon, MD, professor of mental health care delivery, University of Southampton, explained that mental health professionals have been receptive to the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in psychosis, but there needs to be greater expansion to increase availability.

David Kingdon, MD, professor of mental health care delivery, University of Southampton, explained that mental health professionals have been receptive to the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in psychosis, but there needs to be greater expansion to increase availability.

Transcript

In your experience, have mental health care providers and patients been receptive to the increasing use of CBT in psychosis?

I think when we’ve met people and talked with them and when they’ve understood what’s involved, they have been very receptive, because it is something that patients value very, very much, and carers value, so we did a number of sessions at the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill last year, which went down really well; we had a great time there, lot of sharing of experience and understanding. But in terms of service providers, in the UK particularly it’s become quite widespread, but it’s also happening in the US as well, and I think CBT techniques are used partly in some of the early intervention programs that are developing and elsewhere. But we really do need a much greater expansion of training and also just implementation, because it could be very valuable to a lot of people and it’s not really getting there yet.