Dr Frank Porreca: How Advancements in CGRP Inhibitors Paved the Way for Migraine Prevention Therapies

November 4, 2020

The CGRP story is really based on reverse translation and other observations in humans will be pursued along that same model, said Frank Porreca, PhD, professor of pharmacology and anesthesiology at the University of Arizona and a member of the Department of Collaborative Research at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

The CGRP story is really based on reverse translation and other observations in humans will be pursued along that same model, said Frank Porreca, PhD, professor of pharmacology and anesthesiology at the University of Arizona and a member of the Department of Collaborative Research at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

Transcript:

The American Journal of Managed Care® (AJMC®): How have advancements in CGRP inhibitors paved the way for future research into migraine prevention therapies?

Dr. Porreca: The CGRP story is really again, based on this idea of reverse translation. Astute clinical observation that CGRP levels were increased during a migraine attack in humans led to investigation of CGRP mechanisms at preclinical levels and then development of therapeutics. The actual development of therapeutics had the characteristics, not only of being tool compounds that were interesting in the laboratory, but that could actually be used in humans as therapies. I think that there are other observations in humans that will be pursued along that same model. So exactly what's happening in humans evaluated mechanistically and then try to advance that therapy. Obviously, therapies that can be more broadly effective, possibly than anti-CGRP therapies, or can be used in conjunction with CGRP therapies will be hugely important.