Dr Leonard Fromer on Precision Medicine and the Triple Aim

Using precision medicine to implement clinical decisions can help healthcare providers achieve the triple aim, said Leonard M. Fromer, MD, FAAFP, executive medical director of the Group Practice Forum.

Using precision medicine to implement clinical decisions can help healthcare providers achieve the triple aim, said Leonard M. Fromer, MD, FAAFP, executive medical director of the Group Practice Forum.

Transcript (slightly modified)

How does precision medicine further the triple aim?

The triple aim is to find, as I said, better outcomes, better experience in the care process, and lower cost. So if we look at that from a level of the whole country, and then we dive down into different regions and then different metropolitan areas and ultimately dive down to one practice and one patient, ultimately. The triple aim is the same.

You want those three things happening from one patient up to the entire population of our country for our health system. In between all of that, you have these drivers of care, of intervention, of how we organize our system ourselves from each individual person on the front lines taking care of patients in a team-based model, to how we organize our states and our country in our approach to things like coverage, insurance coverage. Things like, how do we organize teams and figure out what inside a health system, a contract exists for how that system is going to be paid, for how they achieve triple aim, what kind of reward and value is going to be available.

All of these are inputs and parameters that matter greatly in how triple aim is defined and then impacts our decision making in healthcare. Clinical decision support when we see patients is driven ultimately by triple aim. Underneath that, we have all these implementation science, kind of data driven things about how we make better decisions to implement what it is we’re supposed to do for the triple aim.

So we have two levels. We have, what should we do, and that’s driven by the clinical science excellence, the evidence. And then we have, how do we do it? Both matter greatly in getting great triple aim results.