Dr Victoria Bae-Jump on Challenges in Treating Patients With Endometrial Cancer

April 27, 2018

I think the hardest thing about advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer is that the outcomes are still fairly poor, explained Victoria Bae-Jump, MD, PhD, associate professor, gynecologic oncology, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

I think the hardest thing about advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer is that the outcomes are still fairly poor, explained Victoria Bae-Jump, MD, PhD, associate professor, gynecologic oncology, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Transcript

What challenges are you faced with in the treatment of patients with advanced and/or recurrent endometrial cancer?

I think the hardest thing about advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer is that the outcomes are still fairly poor for advanced endometrial cancers. You know, the overall 5-year survival is anywhere from 15% to 40%, depending on hat study you have, and we don’t have a very long list of agents, cytotoxics or targeted agents, that endometrial cancer responds to. Recurrent disease is even more dismal for endometrial cancer with actually survival after the diagnosis of recurrence being only between 14 and 15 months.

So, I think the hardest thing is that we don’t have many good treatments to offer advanced and recurrent endometrial cancer patients once we get passed paclitaxel and carboplatin. So, I think that’s the hardest thing to tell patients, that we don’t have as many options as we would like for them to be treated with.