Life Expectancy Under the Affordable Care Act

Under PPACA, in every interaction between patients, doctors, insurers, manufacturers and researchers, the incentive to control costs and provide better service is replaced with the decree to do so.

The main problem with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is that in order to extend healthcare to all citizens as a right the law undermines the fundamental free market basis (or what remains of it) of the entire U.S. medical system. Under PPACA, in every interaction between patients, doctors, insurers, manufacturers and researchers, the incentive to control costs and provide better service is replaced with the decree to do so. When the Affordable Care Act passed through Congress, Nancy Pelosi famously remarked that universal healthcare -- socialized medicine -- was becoming a reality "after 100 years of trying." It will be interesting to see therefore, whether the next 100 years of government-directed medical technology will compare favorably or otherwise with the dizzying advance of medicine during the last 100 years.

Today, ninety-five percent of the new drugs coming on the market are developed for sale in the United States. For years, according to a study in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, pharmaceutical companies in Western Europe have been introducing new medicines in the U.S. before introducing them in their home countries; typically by eighteen months. This is due to regulation of drug prices in Europe that makes recuperation of R&D costs (a very high 20% of revenues in the pharmaceutical industry) impossible there.

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Source: American Thinker