Low-Dose Rituximab Can Help Control RA Symptoms, Study Finds

A Spanish study has found that low dose of rituximab, administered on-demand rather than at predetermined intervals, provides a good long-term treatment option for some patients.

Low and very low doses of rituximab are effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to recent studies. A new study on the real-world use of rituximab in a single center in Spain suggested that a low dose of rituximab, administered on-demand rather than at predetermined intervals, provides a good long-term treatment option for some patients, reported The Center for Biosimilars®.

The retrospective cohort study included adult patients with RA who were treated with rituximab from 2005 to 2014, with a follow-up period through 2015. In total, 114 patients with 409 cycles of treatment were considered.

Rituximab, primarily used as a second-line biologic therapy, was used in a cost-saving and adverse-event reducing on-demand schedule in 94.6% of patients; these patients were assessed for signs of relapse and the need for another rituximab infusion at their regularly scheduled visits, and they also had the option of contacting a healthcare provider by phone if they felt that they were relapsing. The remaining 5.4% of patients were on a fixed 6-month dosing schedule.

Read the full article on The Center for Biosimilars®.

Reference

Cañamares-Orbis I, Merino L, López J, et al. Experience with the use of rituximab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in a tertiary hospital in Spain: RITAR study. [Published online July 19, 2018.] J Clin Rheumatol. doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000000845.