Patient Satisfaction Not Influenced by Fancy Hospital Renovations

For decades, hospital executives across the country have justified expensive renovation and expansion projects by saying they will lead to better patient reviews and recommendations.

For decades, hospital executives across the country have justified expensive renovation and expansion projects by saying they will lead to better patient reviews and recommendations. One study estimated $200 billion might have been spent over a decade on new building. Johns Hopkins Medicine’s construction of a new sleek tower and children’s hospital cost $1.1 billion. Patient judgments have become even more important to hospitals since Medicare started publishing ratings and basing some of its pay on surveys patients fill out after they have left the hospital.

A study, published this month by the Journal of Hospital Medicine, contradicts the presumption that better facilities translate into better patient reviews. Zishan Siddiqui, MD, examined how patient satisfaction scores changed when doctors started practicing in the new tower, which has 355 beds and units for neurology, cardiology, radiology, labor and delivery and other specialties.

Read more at Kaiser Health News: http://bit.ly/1ApDhjV