Systemic Lupus Erythematosus a Risk Factor for Cervical Cancer

Results presented at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress have confirmed that Systemic Lupus Erythematosus can increase the risk of developing cervical cancer in women.

Results presented at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress have confirmed that Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) can increase the risk of developing cervical cancer in women, with the highest risk identified in women treated with immunosuppressive agents for SLE.

The study, which was conducted in Stockholm, evaluated data on women who were diagnosed with SLE between 2006 and 2012. The rate of cervical dysplasia or invasive cervical cancer in these women was double that of a matched general cohort. The authors adjusted the comparison for age, sex, education level, healthcare utilization, number of children, marital status, family history of cervical cancer, and prior cervical screening. Further, women with SLE who received systemic immunosuppressive agents were deemed at greater risk of cervical abnormalities.

According to Hjalmar Wadström, PhD, from the Karolinska Institute and lead investigator of the study, “Previous evidence that SLE or its treatment might increase the risk of cervical neoplasia has been inconclusive. Our findings have confirmed that SLE is a risk factor for cervical malignancies, even after adjusting for important risk determinants such as previous cervical screening.”

In the United States, incidence of SLE has been found to follow a distinct racial and geographical trend, with blacks more susceptible than whites. According to the CDC, annual incidence in 2002-2004 was higher for blacks in Michigan (7.9 vs 3.7 per 100,000 persons) and Georgia (9.4 vs 3.2 per 100,000 persons). Additionally, annual incidence for American Indians and Alaska natives was documented at 7.4 per 100,000 persons. Additionally, women are more susceptible then men.

Reference

Lupus confirmed as risk factor for cervical cancer: Women with lupus treated with immunosuppressives need regular cervical screening. ScienceDaily website. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160609115437.htm. Posted June 9, 2016. Accessed June 10, 2016.