Top Experts to Discuss Stroke Care, Sleep Disorders, and More at Future of Neurology Congress

July 29, 2019
AJMC Staff

Top professionals in neurology will convene in New York City for the first annual International Congress on the Future of Neurology to discuss the latest data and best practices to better inform clinical decision making. The meeting will be held September 27-28 at the InterContinental New York Times Square.

Top professionals in neurology will convene in New York City for the first annual International Congress on the Future of Neurology to discuss the latest data and best practices to better inform clinical decision making. The meeting will be held September 27-28 at the InterContinental New York Times Square.

During the 2-day Congress, attendees will have access to presentations, question-and-answer sessions, and lightning rounds that highlight topics in neurology including stroke medicine, multiple sclerosis, dementia, movement disorders, and epilepsy.

Fred Rincon, MD, MSc, MB.Ethics, FACP, FCCP, FCCM, division head of cerebrovascular disease at the Vicki and Jack Farber Institute for Neuroscience and associate professor of neurology and neurological surgery at Thomas Jefferson University, and Karl Doghramji, MD, professor of psychiatry, neurology, and medicine at Thomas Jefferson University, Medical Director, Jefferson Sleep Disorders Center, and Program Director, Fellowship in Sleep Medicine, previewed sessions they will be moderating in interviews.

Time is essential in stroke care, explained Rincon, and educating patients, family members, bystanders, and medical providers to recognize the symptoms of stroke would help get patients the appropriate care faster.

“We are also investing much more time and research into the use of mobile stroke technology to help recognize stroke patients who may be eligible for intervention prior to their arrival to the emergency department,” he said. “Being able to properly triage patients to an appropriate treatment center or even administering [an intravenous tissue plasminogen activator] in the field can have a significant impact on functional outcomes.”

Doghramji noted that it is critical to identify and manage sleep disorders because disturbed sleep is associated with a variety of impairments, such as increased risk of future mood disorders and cardiometabolic disorders, and it can even shorten lifespans. Among new therapies are hypnotic agents that can manage insomnia and are safer than older therapies.

“Some of the main challenges faced when trying to incorporate nonpharmaceutical treatments like CBT-I [cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia] are a shortage of properly trained therapists, third-party payer support, and time limitations,” he said. “Given that CBT-I is indicated as a first-line treatment for insomnia, it is imperative that the healthcare community works harder to better prepare for and provide these therapies to patients, and work closely with payers to ensure access to this treatment modality.”

For more information and to register, click here. Receive 25% off registration fees with code Neuro19SI.