What Drugs Did Medicare Beneficiaries Use the Most in 2014? Now We Know

The federal government popped the cap off drug spending on Thursday, detailing doctor-by-doctor and drug-by-drug how Medicare and its beneficiaries spent $103 billion on pharmaceuticals in 2013.

The federal government popped the cap off drug spending on Thursday, detailing doctor-by-doctor and drug-by-drug how Medicare and its beneficiaries spent $103 billion on pharmaceuticals in 2013.

The data show that 14 drugs cost the federal government and Medicare beneficiaries more than $1 billion each, accounting for nearly a quarter of Medicare prescription drug spending in 2013. Most of those drugs are used to treat chronic conditions that plague the elderly, including diabetes, depression, high cholesterol and blood pressure, dementia and asthma.

The brand drug Nexium, used to treat heartburn, acid reflux and related stomach ailments, cost the most: $2.5 billion for 1.5 million Medicare patients, who filled 8 million prescriptions and refills. The total cost included what was paid by Medicare, beneficiaries, and third party groups such as supplemental health plans. The cost covered not just the drug ingredients but also sales tax and dispensing fees. It did not, however, include sometimes substantial manufacturer rebates, and the drug makers’ trade group warned that omission distorted the actual cost.

Read the complete article on Kaiser Health News: http://bit.ly/1Jea8u9