What We're Reading: Aetna Deal Drives CVS Profit; Peanut Allergy Treatment; Climate Change Education in Med School

August 8, 2019
AJMC Staff
AJMC Staff

On Wednesday, CVS announced strong second-quarter profits; DBV Technologies has submitted its Biologics License Application to the FDA for its treatment for peanut allergy; doctors, health organizations, and students are pushing for medical education to include climate change.

CVS Beats Profit Estimates, Thanks in Part to Aetna Deal

CVS’ deal with Aetna is beginning to pay off, according to the pharmacy chain’s second-quarter profit, which beat expectations. CVS on Wednesday reported $1.94 billion in profit. The company raised its full-year adjustment earnings forecast to $6.89 to $7.00 per share, up from $6.75 to $6.90. According to Reuters, the company is working to bring more healthcare services into its pharmacies and urge Aetna clients to take advantage of cheaper care for chronic conditions as its in-store clinics.

DBV Technologies Submits Application for Peanut Allergy Treatment

DBV Technologies has submitted its Biologics License Application to the FDA for Viaskin Peanut, its treatment for peanut allergy. The treatment, intended for children aged 4 to 11 years with the allergy, is designed to leverage the skin to activate the immune system and induce desensitization to allergens. In December 2018, DBV voluntarily withdrew its prior submission for the treatment based on additional data needed on manufacturing procedures and quality controls. Yesterday’s submission includes these data.

Doctors, Health Organizations Push for Climate Change Education in Med School

Backed by the American Medical Association, there is a movement from doctors, health organizations, and students for medical education to include climate change. The groups argue that physicians and other healthcare workers need to prepare for the risks association with rising global temperatures, reported The Wall Street Journal. Some schools have started to show support for the movement; The University of Minnesota’s medical, nursing, and pharmacy schools have added curriculum or tweaked existing courses to incorporate climate-related topics.