What We're Reading: Australia and HPV Success; HDHP Slows; Pre-Existing Conditions and GOP Candidates

October 4, 2018

Cervical cancer could be eliminated in Australia within the next 2 decades because of a free government program to vaccinate children against the human papillomavirus; employers have slowed enrollment in high-deductible health plans amid a very tight labor market and a postponement of a tax on healthcare coverage; President Barack Obama’s 2010 healthcare law is threatening Republicans in the midterms who have spent years railing against it and seeking its repeal.

Australia on Track to Eliminate Cervival Cancer

Cervical cancer could be eliminated in Australia within the next 2 decades because of a free government program to vaccinate children against the human papillomavirus, The New York Times reported. By 2028, fewer than 4 women in every 100,000 could be diagnosed with cervical cancer annually in Australia, according to a study in The Lancet Public Health, and by 2066, fewer than 1 woman per year could receive that diagnosis. The vaccination program was implemented in schools nationwide.

Employers Slowing Enrollment in High-Deductible Health Plans

Employers have slowed enrollment in high-deductible health plans amid a very tight labor market and a postponement of a tax on healthcare coverage, according to Kaiser Health News. In some cases, companies have reinstated more traditional plans as a strong job market gives workers more leverage. A return to more generous healthcare coverage is unlikely, however.

GOP Candidates Attempt Balancing Act Between ACA Repeal Efforts, Popularity of Pre-Existing Conditions Protection

President Barack Obama’s 2010 healthcare law is threatening Republicans in the midterms who have spent years railing against it and seeking its repeal, The Washington Post reported. Some are scrambling to demonstrate they support one of the law’s most popular features—protections from discrimination based on pre-existing health conditions—when they are also actively continuing to support efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act.