What We're Reading: Battling Addiction Amid Pandemic; Revising WHO's COVID-19 Recommendations; Gym Safety

July 6, 2020

Self-isolation and potential exposure of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were spotlighted as notable issues affecting addiction management; hundreds of scientists have called for the World Health Organization (WHO) to revise recommendations on COVID-19 as they highlight the airborne properties of the virus; considering safety measures and other factors when exercising in public gyms.

Battling Addiction Amid Pandemic

Kaiser Health News highlighted that self-isolation and potential exposure of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have caused a myriad of difficulties for patients seeking treatment for addiction. Notably, drug rehabs nationwide were said to have experienced either health or financial-related issues due to the pandemic that have forced them to close or limit operations. These affected services, especially in poverty-stricken areas, have aligned with sales of alcohol that have risen since the onset of the pandemic.

Scientists Ask WHO to Revise Recommendations on COVID-19

According to Reuters, hundreds of scientists have called for the World Health Organization (WHO) to revise recommendations on COVID-19 as they highlight the airborne potential of the virus. Previously, WHO stated that COVID-19 spreads primarily via small droplets from the nose or mouth that occurs as an infected individual coughs, sneezes, or speaks. However, 239 scientists in 32 countries plan to outline evidence showing that smaller particles of the virus in the air can infect people.

Is Working Out in Gyms Safe?

An article published by NPR discussed safety measures to consider when exercising in public gyms amid resurgent cases of COVID-19 nationwide. Beyond assessing one’s own risk and available alternatives, if you do plan on returning to gyms the article says to monitor the gym’s safety measures, such as temperature checks and regular equipment cleaning. Moreover, practicing social distancing and wearing masks when in the gym can prove crucial, as well as examining ventilation in these facilities. However, all these considerations are ultimately based on location, as exercising indoors in hot spots is significantly more risky than in areas with low infection rates.