What We're Reading: Interchangeable Biosimilars; Nevada's Health Insurance; Shortage for Allergies

FDA Says Interchangeable Biosimilars Are Coming

Although the United States still does not have a single interchangeable biosimilar approved, the FDA expects there to be one within the next 2 years, reported RAPS. The FDA is currently reviewing comments on draft guidance on biosimilar interchangeability and still has to issue either revised draft guidance or final guidance in the next 2 years. Currently, 9 companies have 14 biosimilar applications submitted with the agency.

Rural Counties in Nevada Lack Marketplace Insurers

In 2018, nearly all of Nevada’s rural counties will not have a single health insurer on the individual marketplace. Overall, 8000 people will lose insurance and have no other options, reported the Reno Gazette-Journal. Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval said his administration is working to ensure there is at least a safety net in place. He has vocally opposed the Senate healthcare bill, which would roll back Medicaid expansion, and he and the state’s Republican senator, Dean Heller, have not changed their minds on the issue.

Allergists Warn of Shortages for Insect Stings

This summer in the United States, allergy shots that prevent life-threatening reactions to insect stings are in short supply. Extracts for the shots have been scarce, plus a contamination issue caused one manufacturer to shut down production, reported Kaiser Health News. As a result, allergists are rationing their supplies and only giving them to patients who need the doses the most.